About the Run

On February 20, Charlie, Ray and Kevin touched the Red Sea, just a few hours before sunset. Their quest had lasted 111 days and taken them through 6 countries: Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Niger, Libya, and Egypt. By the team's daily GPS record, they had traveled over 4,300 miles (6,920 kilometers). They fought through injury and extreme fatigue to reach their goal, which changed them forever.

The runners embrace hands in strength at the starting line of the expedition.

The runners using Magellan GPS devices to navigate their way across 4,000 miles of the Sahara Desert.

These last days of the expedition were emblematic of the entire expedition, with highs and lows, camaraderie and solitude, and encounters with both the natural wonders and teeming societies of Africa. Over their quest, the runners learned that it was necessary for them and their team to avoid fighting against the elements served up by the Sahara, because the immeasurable power of the continent will always win out. Instead, they learned how to adapt to their climate and surroundings as best they could, in order to make the steady progress that each of the 111 days required of their minds and bodies. Thus, they were able to save their energy for their physical achievement, which led to success as measured by their achievement and the depth of their experience.

Whether it was encounters with the Tuaregs of Niger or running through the wondrous Pyramids of Giza, the experiences endure. The children that received them with shouts of greeting and ran alongside them refreshed and renewed their vigor in every country. The lands they visited mixed natural beauty with the harshest living conditions: from the solitude of the Tenere Desert to the bustling heat of Dakar, Senegal, and the overwhelming crush of Cairo, Africa's largest metropolis. Every location along the way provided its own challenge and held a unique reward for the three explorers and their team.

And now the expedition has concluded.

Successful.

Life-changing.

Incredible, but true.

More than ever, the runners and their team are committed to the land and people they visited. The international media has turned its eye to the expedition's achievement, including the attention and support that they are bringing to the water crisis in Africa through H2O Africa. This fall, the film Running the Sahara will premiere to tell the story of this unprecedented quest. Until then, come back to this site to see more about the runners' story.

The runners embrace hands in strength at the starting line of the expedition.

The runners embrace hands in strength at the starting line of the expedition.

Photograph by Don Holtz

Charlie Engle meets the children of a local village.

Charlie Engle meets the children of a local village.

Photograph by Don Holtz

The runners using Magellan GPS devices to navigate their way across 4,000 miles of the Sahara Desert.

The runners using Magellan GPS devices to navigate their way across 4,000 miles of the Sahara Desert.

Photograph by Don Holtz